Upcoming Services & Sharing Circles

All in-person Services and Circles canceled until further notice
As we all take precautions for the Covid-19 virus spread, UCOT will be cancelling upcoming live gatherings until further notice. We will conduct live-streaming services on Zoom until further notice. If you are not currently getting the weekly email that contains the necessary Zoom link, please visit our “Contact page and send your information to us on the contact form.


Sunday, September 5, 2021, 11 a.m. — Service – Small but Mighty Voices,
Rev. Matthew Pargeter-Villarreal

The average UU congregation is between 50 and 100 members. Many fellowships throughout the country are even smaller than that. As wonderful as a small group of committed individuals can be, it can also often give way to disagreements and petty squabbles. This Sunday, join in for a conversation on how we can harness the power of small congregations—to make sure that they can not only survive, but thrive as well.

For information on how to join us, please complete our contact form at https://uutaos.org/contact/ unless you are already on our weekly email list.


Sunday, September 12, 2021, 11 a.m. — Sharing Circle – Purple Mountain Majesties

“Purple Mountain Majesties” evokes color, mass, spirit. This phrase from the revered patriotic song “America the Beautiful,” the song which I have mistakenly referred to as our nation’s national anthem, has captivated the imagination of America since it was penned by Katherine Lee Bates in 1893. The poem and the line I have cited, was inspired by a cross country tour Bates took, fulfilling speaking engagements on social justice issues, which brought her from her home in Massachusetts to where her view included Pikes Peak, CO. Purple mountain majesties – evoking time of day, grandeur, the sacredness of nature. What do these words inspire in you? In your inner eye? In your heart of hearts?

What does Bates’ journey inspire? She, an unmarried, college-educated woman, raised by a single mother who valued education, traveled across the country in the late 1800’s to speak on labor reform, pens the poem that later was put to music and thereby nominated to be the national anthem, but was relegated second choice to the winning song “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

For information on how to join us, please complete our contact form at https://uutaos.org/contact/ unless you are already on our weekly email list.


Sunday, September 19, 2021, 11 a.m. — Service – The Question Box, 
Rev. Gary Kowalski

Do you have a question that’s been nagging at you? A moral dilemma? A relationship issue that never quite gets resolved? A recurring dream in need of interpretation? A curious thought about religion, or philosophy, or the meaning of it all? This is your turn to write the sermon or, at least, have the minister respond to whatever’s on your mind. Please send Gary your questions or suggested topics at least one week prior to his talk.

For information on how to join us, please complete our contact form at https://uutaos.org/contact/ unless you are already on our weekly email list.


Sunday, September 26, 2021, 11 a.m. — Sharing Circle – Purple Mountain Majesties

“Purple Mountain Majesties” evokes color, mass, spirit. This phrase from the revered patriotic song “America the Beautiful,” the song which I have mistakenly referred to as our nation’s national anthem, has captivated the imagination of America since it was penned by Katherine Lee Bates in 1893. The poem and the line I have cited, was inspired by a cross country tour Bates took, fulfilling speaking engagements on social justice issues, which brought her from her home in Massachusetts to where her view included Pikes Peak, CO. Purple mountain majesties – evoking time of day, grandeur, the sacredness of nature. What do these words inspire in you? In your inner eye? In your heart of hearts?

What does Bates’ journey inspire? She, an unmarried, college-educated woman, raised by a single mother who valued education, traveled across the country in the late 1800’s to speak on labor reform, pens the poem that later was put to music and thereby nominated to be the national anthem, but was relegated second choice to the winning song “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

For information on how to join us, please complete our contact form at https://uutaos.org/contact/ unless you are already on our weekly email list.

 

For more information on Sharing Circles, click here.